Using lasers for faster transfusions

November 18, 2019
laser_blood_transfusion_blog

A new type of blood warmer using laser technology has the potential to cut pre-transfusion blood testing incubation times from 5-30 minutes to 40 seconds.

A faster turnaround time in blood testing and transfusions presents the possibility of increased survival rates for accident victims, moms and newborns, and patients in surgery. 

The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports by researchers from the Bioresource Processing Institute of Australia at the University of Monash.

“It is nice to see someone improving the way we perform antigen-antibody complex assays,” said Scott Jones, Vice President of Scientific Affairs at BioBridge Global. “Most of the methods we use are back from the 70s.”

Along with the rapid warming process, no damage was found on the red blood cells or antibodies.

“This study demonstrates laser-incubated immunohaematological testing to be both faster and more sensitive than current best practice, with clearly positive results seen from incubations of just 40 seconds,” said lead researcher Dr. Clare Manderson on the university’s news release.

The technology brings great promise to the field of immunohematology.

“It will be important to see if antibodies other than anti-D can be picked up by the system, or used for mass screening to find rare blood, especially if the patient’s antibody is a clinically significant IgG,” said Dr. Rachel Beddard, Chief Medical Officer at BioBridge Global.

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